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Spellcraft: Level Five



Establishing Your Beliefs


Associations

When you get comfortable with these concepts, you’ll be able to use them to create powerful spells that will resonate strongly with your beliefs, memories, and life experiences. You can also use the principles in sympathetic magick to make changes to any spell you find online or in a book to tailor it to your specific needs and personal beliefs.


Here are a few exercises you can do to discover and identify the beliefs and associations you already hold.



Color

Write down several colors that you use frequently in your Witchcraft in your journal.

Red, pink, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, black, and white are common colors in spells. You can also include metallic colors like gold and silver if desired.


Go somewhere that you know you’ll see a lot of colors. This can be an art museum, a botanical garden, a toy store, or even watching tv.


Whenever a color draws your attention, write down the thoughts, feelings, images, or energies that come up for you as you take in that color.


Notice where these colors appear most frequently and in relation to which objects or situations. Do this until you have notes on every color.


Then look back over your list and see if there are any patterns.


Look for colors that bring up similar energies and colors that bring up opposite energies.

While color magick can be highly personal, in the case of sympathetic magick, you are looking for archetypal and universal correspondences. You are relying not on your own associations but on the relationship between related items or ideas.



Nature

Spend some time in nature and be intentional about experiencing nature through all of your senses. I recommend jotting notes down in a grimoire or journal, so you can look back on your observations when you’re putting together spells in the future.


Notice what you see—colors, shapes, light, shadow, animals, clouds, and plants.


Write down what words, images, or energies come to mind when you see each sight.


Then bring your awareness to the sounds you hear—the buzzing of insects, the rustling of squirrels, the creak of the branches, the whistling of the wind, and the sound of your breath. Again, reflect on what energies you associate with each sound.


Use your imagination to find relationships between these things, like you would when cloud watching. Some relationships, like sunflowers and sunshine or the human-shaped mandrake root and poppets, may be easy to spot. Others may take more care and contemplation as in the relationship between mugwort and the moon. (for example, the undersides of mugwort plants are silvery, like moonlight)



Symbols

Spend some time creating a list of associations with a variety of objects. These can be archetypal or you can look for more personal meaning.


Some examples include:

  • Keys - opening doors, unlocking potential, creating opportunity, exposing the hidden or secret

  • Locks - protection, safety, secrets kept, barriers

  • Books - learning, knowledge, communication, secrets revealed, expansion, possibility

  • Trees - the connection between earth and sky, the underworld and higher realms, growth, strength, stillness, slow steady progress, interconnected life

  • Horses - movement, transportation, sticking together, grace, speed



Exploring Symbolism


Let's talk about Symbolism. A symbol is a mark, sign, or word that indicates, signifies, or is understood as representing an idea, object, or relationship. Symbols allow people to go beyond what is known or seen by creating linkages between otherwise very different concepts and experiences.


Symbolism is used extensively in Spellcraft and magickal practices around the world. The use of symbols is ancient, and our brains are hardwired to recognize and speak the language of symbols.


How we interpret symbols can be very subjective and personal. Our own experiences, biases and culture influences the way we think of symbols. Some symbols have universal meanings, while others are very specific to region or the individual. There are no wrong answers here.

Get as creative or abstract as you want when you’re using symbolism to power your magick. It’s like stepping into your own story.


QUESTION 1:

What does the bean in Jack and the Beanstalk represent for you? Rapid growth?

Big aspirations? How can you use that energy in a spell?


QUESTION 2:

What does the forest in Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream represent to

you? A place of magick? A place removed from the oppressive rules and structure of

society where you can truly be yourself without judgment? How can you use that

symbolism in your magick?


QUESTION 3:

What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use this symbol in your magick?



QUESTION 4:

What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use this symbol in your magick?



QUESTION 5:

What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use this symbol in your magick?



QUESTION 6:What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use this symbol in your magick?



QUESTION 7:

What do these symbols mean to you? How can you use them in your magick?



QUESTION 8:

What do these symbols mean to you? How can you use them in your magick?


QUESTION 9:

What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use it in your magick?



QUESTION 10:

What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use it in your magick?



QUESTION 11:

What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use it in your magick?


QUESTION 12:

What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use it in your magick?



QUESTION 13:

What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use it in your magick?



QUESTION 14:

What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use it in your magick?



QUESTION 15:

What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use it in your magick?



QUESTION 16:

What does this symbol mean to you? How can you use it in your magick?





You


Dedicate a few pages in your grimoire or journal for noting any words, objects, colors, images, or even song lyrics that represent you.